crohet houndstooth cushion

How to: Houndstooth with C2C crochet

On my hook at the moment is a mega houndstooth crochet jacket; I’m currently half way there with it, but the way I’m making it is a great ‘cheats’ option when you can’t face doing a whole piece of c2c only to notice you’ve gone wrong in the middle and have to pull it all out (we’ve all been there).

Crochet designers often make cardigans and jackets out of granny squares as it’s such a simple and effective method of making – so I’ve put a spin on this with this bold monochrome design.

Although I’m making a jacket, I think the design lends itself so well to homeware and interiors. With it laid out on my sofa all I want to do is make a blanket, it looks so nice – and that’s exactly what I will be doing with some chunky soft yarn once I’m done with this project.

Anyway – the design is quite a simple idea – if you look at houndstooth long enough you will start to notice it can be reduced to squares of solid colour and diagonal stripes. With that in mind, all I had to do was make these squares in crochet, with c2c being worked diagonally it seemed like the perfect option.

Sounds so simple, right? Well, it took a bit more thinking than that in order to get the stripes all the same size and to match up with the stitches the right way. I’m a bit of a perfectionist, so simply flipping the design to get the stripes in the opposite colour pattern wasn’t an option as it meant the stitches would be the wrong way – that is, where you make the three trebles into the chain, the wrong side of those trebles should be vertical not horizontal (and sort of raised looking) and the right side horizontal.

It took a bit of thinking and trial and error, but I eventually figured it out and in the end it required the combination of squares and rectangles. This was essential as it was not possible to get the diagonal stripes all the same size within a square of c2c stitches.

Combining squares and rectangles means that you have different sizes, but don’t panic, it’s simplified – horizontally, rows are made up of 6×6 solid black squares and 7×6 landscape rectangles (so the short side of the rectangle is the same size as the square). The next horizontal row will be made up of 6×7 portrait rectangle and 7×7 solid white square (so the long side of the rectangle will match up to the white square, the short side of the rectangle will join up to the 6×6 black square above and below and the 7×7 white square will join up with the long side  landscape stripe above and below) Don’t panic! There’s a diagram below to show it.

How to

 

As described above, you will need to make 4 basic square/rectangle designs, A, B, C, and D.

Square A
Square A
Square B
Square B
Square C
Square C
Square D
Square D

 

Make as many of these squares/rectangles as you require for the size of your project and follow the below layout design for assembly (PDF link below):

Houndstooth layout

Houndstooth assembly graph

To join together, you can of course use whatever method you like, but in order to get the cleanest finish in the quickest way I put the right sides together, joined the black yarn in the corners of two squares then: 1 dc, ch 2, 1 dc in between the small squares you have made from your trebles. Join in columns then join across. This means that you wont have any borders disrupting your stripes and using the black to join looks like a gap rather than if you use white, which shows up as a stitch when you join two black parts together.

I hope you feel confident enough to try this design – it’s quite simple if you pay attention to where to start your decrease. I find it is best to make the squares/rectangles in batches of the same design, as it’s easy to confuse your striped squares and go wrong.

Please tag me in your makes on Instagram @sylviamargaretdesigns if you try it- I can’t wait to see what you do with the design!

 

 

 

 

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